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May is recognized each year as National Arthritis Awareness Month. Therefore, we wanted to give you some information on Arthritis, as it is the nation’s leading cause of disabilities.

1. Arthritis is Not a Single Disease

 

Many people think that arthritis is a single disease.  Actually, there are over 100 types of arthritis and related rheumatic conditions.  It is important to be accurately diagnosed and know your type of arthritis so that you can begin an appropriate course of treatment

 

2.  No known Cure for most Types of Arthritis

Though some forms of arthritis, like Lyme arthritis, may be curable with antibiotics, there is no single medication or treatment that cures most types of arthritis. Treatment options can help manage pain, control arthritis symptoms, slow disease progression, and reduce joint damage or deformity.

3.  Rheumatologist Specialize in Diagnosis and Treatment of Rheumatic Conditions.

Your primary care doctor can refer you to a rheumatologist or you can get an appointment through self-referral if your health insurance allows it. Evaluation by a rheumatologist is important so that you can determine your type of arthritis and start a treatment plan.

4. Early Diagnosis and Treatment for Arthritis is Essential

Since there are various types of arthritis and many treatment options, it is important to be properly diagnosed and treated early in the course of the disease. Delaying diagnosis and treatment may allow arthritis symptoms to worsen. Early diagnosis and treatment offer the best chance for preventing joint damage and disability.

5.  Finding Optimal Arthritis Treatment Requires Trial and Error

There are two important points to remember about arthritis treatment. Patients vary in their response to arthritis medications or other arthritis treatments. What works for one person may not work for another. Also, to find the safest and most effective medication or combination of medications, you'll have to weigh the benefits versus the risks.

6. Healthy Lifestyle and Good Habits Can Positively Impact Arthritis

Regular exercise, maintaining your ideal weight, stress reduction, being a non-smoker and getting good sleep are important for living well with arthritis.

7.  Myths and Misconceptions about Arthritis

Have you heard that arthritis only affects old people? Not true. Did you know that arthritis causes only minor aches and pains? Not true. Common forms of arthritis can be cured by changes in your diet? While rare forms of arthritis, such as arthropathy associated with Celiac disease, can effectively be cured with a gluten free diet, this claim is inapplicable to the vast majority of cases. These and several other examples of myths and misconceptions about arthritis, perpetuated by the spread of inaccurate information, can keep a person from managing the disease properly.

For additional information on Arthritis, contact one of our trusted pharmacists or your health care provider.

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Itchy eyes, runny nose, sneezing, fatigue…. These are just a few of the signs of seasonal allergies—also known as hay fever. And get ready: It looks like we may have a real doozy of an allergy season this year.  Milder winter temperatures in places can cause plants to pollinate early. And a rainier spring leads to quick plant growth, as well as an increase in mold.

Allergic reactions mostly occur when your body responds to a “false alarm.” And, as you well know, there isn’t a cure for seasonal allergies. But there’s no reason to let this time of year take all the spring out of your step! Arm yourself with information.

Monitor climate factors. When checking the weather and planning your day, keep these things in mind:

·         Heat and high humidity promote the growth of molds.

·         Cool nights and warm days allow tree, grass, and ragweed pollens to thrive.

·         In spring and summer, tree and grass pollen levels tend to peak in the evening.

·         In late summer and early fall, ragweed pollen levels tend to peak in the morning.

·         Windy and warm days often result in surging pollen counts.

·         After a rainfall, pollen counts may go up, even though the rain temporarily washes pollen away.

Avoid your triggers. If allergies are making you miserable, you may want to see an allergist. Specializing in allergies, this person can help you figure out what triggers your symptoms. Then you can find ways to cut off those triggers at the pass. During allergy season:

·         Keep windows and doors shut in your car and home.

·         Monitor pollen and mold counts daily. Weather reporters often provide this information.

·         After working or playing outdoors, take a shower, wash your hair, and change your clothes.

·         When doing chores outside, wear a NIOSH-rated filter mask. Better yet? Delegate!

·         Be on the lookout for mold, which can build up in moist months. A deep spring cleaning will help get rid of mold and other allergens. Cleanliness may not be close to godliness. But it sure may help you feel better.

·         Clear the air with a HEPA room air cleaner rated with a Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR). If you have central air, use air filters with a MERV rating of 11 or 12. Change air filters every three months.

Relieve your symptoms. Corticosteroid nasal sprays, decongestants, antihistamines. These are examples of over-the-counter drugs that can help relieve your symptoms. Come talk to me to make sure you’re using them the right way. If side effects are a problem, we can work together to come up with a solution. For example, a few possible side effects of antihistamines are sleepiness, dry mouth, constipation, and light-headedness.

For some people, allergies can lead to or coexist with other health problems such as asthma or sinusitis. Asthma narrows or blocks the airways. Sinusitis is caused by inflammation or infection of cavities behind the nose.Just one more reason why working with your doctor and pharmacist is a good idea.

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